Sunday, 6 August 2017

Thoughts for heavenly citizens

In Revelation 17:1–19:5, a prolonged description is given of Babylon, not the ancient city, but what it represents in Revelation, the city of fallen man as opposed to the heavenly city. How should we respond to the description because it is connected to much of what we see around us?

Babylon is condemned because she tried to take the place of God. She aimed to offer security, satisfaction, success and stability, things which only God can provide. Instead she produced danger, disappointment, failure and instability. We see that everywhere in the world. Promises that never materialise. Hopes that are dashed. Problems that are unsolved. Humans, even when functioning together, can never be God.

God tells his people in 18:4 to have nothing to do with Babylon. Since he is not describing a literal city the exit he mentions is not a physical one. Instead, it is a spiritual refusal to participate in the lifestyle advocated by the city of man. Here is a reminder that believers are to be different from those who do not serve God. 

What is our hope as we live in the city of man and watch people making war with the King? Our confidence is based on the abilities of Jesus to defeat all his opponents. Everyone who tries to defeat the kingdom of Jesus will be defeated by him. Whatever intrigue there may be between the beast, the kings and Babylon, they cannot defeat Jesus even if at times they treat his people with great cruelty.

The consolation that we can take from this description of Babylon is that the names of those it attacks are written in the book of life from the foundation of the world (17:8). We are told in chapter 5 of this book that the book of life is in the hand of the King and he is ruling to ensure that his people will be brought to glory. Because he is the King, he works all things (not just the little number things that happen to each person) together for the good of his people. Let his enemies attack, he will prosper.

Where is this all going to end? The answer to that question is with Jesus leading the praise of his people (19:5). Those who have been redeemed, whether great or small in this life, will hear the call from the Chief Musician, the Leader of the heavenly song, to participate together in a great song of praise that ascribes all the glory for their victory to God. Of course, that is not the end, but the beginning. The end of the earthly city, but not of the heavenly. Now all its citizens are together, and ahead for them is glory, with Jesus.

No comments: